Your April 20 Edition Of Small Business Today

Written by on April 20, 2011 in Small Business News - No comments
Small-Business-Today

Once a week, we’ll deliver a roundup of small business news and advice from around the nation.

A Big Apple Bite Of The Lending Situation

If you’re looking for a microcosm of the lending situation nationwide, where better to look than the classic American hub of commerce in New York City? According to a recent Wall Street Journal report, credit card usage was up among most firms. Here’s more:

The survey showed most small business relied on bank financing for operations, with 68% of respondents listing at least one credit product among their top three sources of financing. A majority of companies, 63%, said business earnings were one of the most important types of financing.

Check out the full report for even more.

A Different Take On Financial Management

If you want an alternative take on how to effectively manage your finances and make some money, this Everything Finance article is at the very least an interesting read. Any list that advises you to have fun and sock away money for yourself is one that’s worth a mull.

McJob Push Successful

Looking for an initial report on how McDonald’s did with their massive, 50,000 worker hiring drive on Tuesday? Look no further.

The big question now is whether other franchises will choose to follow in their footsteps. If the franchise financing market picks up, perhaps they will.

Inuit Moves Mobile

One of the most highly recommended small business blogs out there—besides ours!—has made itself more mobile friendly. You should make it a priority to check out Intuit on your mobile device of choice and see how it works for you.

Got more suggestions for future editions? Let us know!

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About the Author

Dave Choate is the lead writer for BizEngine, longtime blogger and voracious reader of all things business and news. Dedicated to delivering small business news, information and analysis that matters.

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