Chuck Blakeman: Why Small Business Is Fed Up With Government

Written by on January 25, 2013 in Business Loans, Credit Solutions - No comments
Small businesses don't trust the government

Re-printed with permission from Chuck Blakeman.

Both sides are addicted to Big.

What really grinds the gears of small business owners is the near-complete inattention by lawmakers on who creates jobs.

So said Kimble Fletcher Ainslie in a Cato Institute article from December 20, 2001 titled “Bush Ignores Small Business.”

Eight years later under a different president, Catherine Clifford’s article in CNNMoney.com on September 30, 2009 continued the criticism of lawmakers ignoring small business:

Business owners really bring out the pitchforks when they consider the speed with which billions of dollars were distributed to large Wall Street firms and banks. That is what sticks in the small business owner’s throat more than anything.

Banks received $700 billion dollars in handouts in October 2008, with almost no regulations or restrictions. In February 2009, big businesses and big state governments received $787 billion, an incomprehensible $1.5 trillion total dollars. General Motors alone received $30 billion dollars when they would not have qualified for a credit card.

The top job provider in the U.S. economy is businesses under 10 employees. Those with 11-19 employees are second. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of all businesses in America have less than 10 employees.

In February 2009 while big businesses and big state governments were receiving $787 billion, the politicians threw a $255 million bone to small businesses in the form of the SBA ARC loan program, providing a potential $35,000 for a business that could get one. That’s 2/100th of one percent of the $1.5 trillion dedicated to the single largest job growth sector in our economy. While giant banks and corporations got handouts and bailouts many times in just a few days, the firstARC loan didn’t get processed until June 2009, five months later. By December 2009, only 45% of that tiny amount had been loaned.

Adding insult to injury, in December 2009, Republican Senator Olympia Snowe, a self-proclaimed small business advocate, introduced legislation to kill the program and return the remaining 55% back to the Treasury immediately.

Small business owners are not fed up with the government because they don’t get handouts. They are fed up with the symbiotic, parasitic relationship between politicians, big business and big banks. It’s hard enough to grow a small business. Swimming upstream against the constant deluge of advantages, handouts, bailouts, special loan programs and preferential treatment given to big businesses is the real rub.

The mis-named Small Business Administration is of no help. When the SBA was created in 1953 the big business lobby got their political friends to define small business as any business with under 500 employees, which is 99.94% of all businesses in America (only 17,000 of 28 million are larger than 500 employees). It’s like calling everyone under 7′ tall “short”. So it’s no surprise that almost all of the SBA’s attention is on businesses that are 6-7′ tall. Businesses under 5′ 4″ aren’t on the radar. So even with the SBA, true small businesses are on the outside looking in.

In 2009 Australia passed the Fair Work Act, legally defining a small business as having fewer than 15 employees. A similar law in the U.S. would be a good start. Then small business needs the creation of a real SBA, not so they can get handouts, too, but so they have a seat at the table to level out what has been an un-level playing field for decades.

The big business-big government parasitic relationship has been exposed by this last recession. It’s time to put an end to all the patronage that goes between the two of them, all to the detriment of true small businesses.

by Chuck Blakeman, Author of the #1 Rated Business Book of the Year, Making Money is Killing Your Business

www.ChuckBlakeman.com

About the Author

Chuck Blakeman is an internationally recognized business expert with The Crankset Group. He pens weekly columns for BizEngine.

Comments are closed.